accumulator seriali - part 26

antique family photo album / paperiaarre.com As you may very well know, I have tons of old photos of my maternal great grandaunt Saima because her husband Emil was an amateur photographer. The paternal side of my family is much less documented. When I got this beautiful antique family album it had some cabinet photos and some loose photos slipped between the pages, and my father could only name less than a handful of the people featured. Many people have a definite Rantakari look about them (or at least they have noses big enough to be family), but they no longer have names for us remaining.

antique family photo album / paperiaarre.com

The most familiar faces are now hanging on the gallery wall in our hallway, and even fewer photos remain in the album. The album is so worn and tattered the photos remaining barely stay in place, and I've gotten permission to repurpose the album should I want to. The album itself apparently isn't a family treasure, so it remains to be seen whether or not the loose pages will find their way into a mixed media project of mine. For the time being it can stay as it is.

antique family photo album / paperiaarre.com

These sisters were photographed by Tyyne Böök in Helsinki. I'm always happy to see female photographers' names in these cabinet photos. A little detective work revealed that Tyyne had her own photography studio from 1913-1926, and also owned a women's lingerie and embroidery shop.

antique family photo album / paperiaarre.com

A serious Mr. with better posture than his descendants.

antique family photo album / paperiaarre.com As a bookbinder I naturally appreciate the structural aspects of this piece even now that it's falling apart. The velvet spine and corners have lost their nap almost entirely, the cover has also began to flake off, bits fall out if the album is opened, and the clasp is lost. But I imagine this once was a very fine album altogether, back when most people in it still had names.

accumulator seriali - part 23

grandmother's war-time quote book / paperiaarre.com Back in June I shared my maternal grandmother's childhood quote book filled with short poems and Victorian scraps. Today it's time to take a look at my paternal grandmother's war-time quote book. Compared to the fancy little 20´s book this black notebook from 1941-1942 is plain and unembellished. My paternal grandmother worked at an army canteen during the war, and this book was signed by the people she met there. It's full of song lyrics, poems, and small notes, written in such different hands, with different pens and pencils. A few talented guys also drew pictures for my grandmother. The sheer variety is just wonderful!

grandmother's war-time quote book / paperiaarre.com

The majority of the pages are filled with song lyrics - some of them are now classic tunes, but there are masses of propaganda songs in there, too. I'm not a fan of those, so I'm sharing only the less grim bits here today. The Star-dust foxtrot below is unexpectedly written in English, and less surprisingly there are also some Swedish and German lyrics in there. The majority is of course in Finnish.

grandmother's war-time quote book / paperiaarre.com

grandmother's war-time quote book / paperiaarre.com

grandmother's war-time quote book / paperiaarre.com

grandmother's war-time quote book / paperiaarre.com

A very clever corporal wrote a sexist note about the different stages of woman's life. At fifteen they're innocent like Hawaii, but at sixty they're automatically as distant as Australia. The other note by the same guy is a play with a traditional rhyme that literally translates as three words to you: be my friend - this chap wrote "three words to you: buy me coffee".

grandmother's war-time quote book / paperiaarre.com

grandmother's war-time quote book / paperiaarre.com

After Christmas 1942 my grandmother received congratulations for her engagement to my grandfather.

grandmother's war-time quote book / paperiaarre.com

Among the song lyrics and poems there was this lone note for the measurements of an ice cellar. Somehow this is quite endearing to me. I never succeed in keeping a notebook dedicated to just one kind of notes either, some shopping list or the measurements for a book always sneaks in!

I never got the chance to know my paternal grandmother as an adult, or even as a teenager. Reading this notebook gives me a new kind of window into her life, even though there are very few truly personal notes written to her in there.  I also appreciate how this notebook was saved for all these years, and how all the numerous, now forgotten, brief encounters are still kept safe on its pages.

Tallenna

accumulator seriali - part 16

vintage puzzles from my collection - paperiaarre.com

This Saturday you're getting a double dose of vintage puzzles. My mother is writing about her vintage puzzle collection in her blog, Kotkarankki. My collection is really just the result of some of her collection migrating North. I'll let my mother tell you more about the history of these puzzles. All these puzzles were originally my grandmother's, and they have the most tedious puzzle pieces on Earth.

vintage puzzles from my collection - paperiaarre.com

The person making this little kitchen maid puzzle must have looked for the blackest painting available, and the pieces seem to follow the logic that the two pieces that look like the least likely match are a match. The puzzle has only 160 pieces, but it still takes a ridiculously long time to finish even for someone who finishes 1000-piece-puzzles in a day or two (three max, if I practice self control).

vintage puzzles from my collection - paperiaarre.com

Lots of lovely old boxes were reused for puzzles, but the brown paper one is actually an original puzzle box, so no hope of ever finding a helpful illustration on the cover of the box.

vintage puzzles from my collection - paperiaarre.com

This puzzle was apparently amazingly wonderful as there are two of these, now appropriately one for me and one for my mother.

vintage puzzles from my collection - paperiaarre.com

A few years ago my mother built a bunch of puzzles, took photos, and printed them to be folded inside the boxes. These puzzles are hard enough even with the photos. The boxes usually include a handwritten name, the number of pieces, and a note of whether or not all pieces are present. The Swimmer has had all 163 pieces in January 1984 (when I was still in my mother's belly), in November 1990, and they're still here in May 2016. Good job, grandmother, mother and me!

vintage puzzles from my collection - paperiaarre.com

vintage puzzles from my collection - paperiaarre.com

As a child this Giselle puzzle was my favourite. I was definitely going through a phase then where tragic love stories and gorgeous dresses were a thing. Oh wait, it wasn't a phase, they still are!

vintage puzzles from my collection - paperiaarre.com

This is a rare bird as it has that big illustrated box, but the pieces are still those wiggly difficult ones. Giselle is also a bit larger than the others, and the pieces are of better quality wood (some of the other ones are actually depression era cardboard). Fancy things come from England - the others, I believe, were made in Finland.

I planned to take a photo of my modern puzzle collection to accompany these puzzles, but came to the conclusion it is not healthy to own that many puzzles and decided not to share that dark side of me.