accumulator seriali - part 28

vintage cameras - paperiaarre.com Two vintage cameras isn't really a camera collection, but this Accumulator Seriali series is also about accumulations, not just about things I specifically collect. These adorable cameras were given to me by my father, but they originally belonged to his father or grandfather. The Zeiss Ikon Baby Box (that really is such a baby camera at only 8cm / 3.1" tall) is from the 1930's. The larger Kodak Brownie Reflex Synchro is from 1940's.

vintage cameras - paperiaarre.com

I don't know anything about cameras, really. At least not about old film cameras, so I don't know if these two are in working condition. I highly doubt it, though. Neither one is worth much, but I don't really save stuff because it's worth something. These are simply just too cool to let my father throw them away!

vintage cameras - paperiaarre.com

I have a little shelf on the livingroom wall where I gather a changing collection of pretty things. That's were these cameras currently hang out.

vintage cameras - paperiaarre.com

Keeping the vintage cameras company: a wooden artists' book by Francesca Iannaccone, a selection of random brass sculpture things (and a wonderful old ladle), our netsukes, and my grandfather's sand jars. There's also an empty space for something tall I've yet to come up with. I'm thinking some beautiful old bottle or vase could go there - maybe with a single flower in it, if I feel like splurging a tiny bit.

vintage cameras - paperiaarre.com

Today is my second to last day in London, and I hope I can build an entirely new display with my new finds once I return home!

accumulator seriali - part 27

a selection from my vintage lace collection - paperiaarre.com Ever since I began making books in 2002 I've used vintage materials for the covers. Vintage lace made its first appearance probably in 2003, and it's been a often used element ever since. At first I used lace I'd received from my mother and grandmother, but once there were only the most precious pieces left I realised I had to begin collecting vintage lace in earnest for future book projects. So, now I pick up special (and afforable) bits of lace at antique markets and online, and my collection grows. Still, there's always room for quality pieces!

a selection from my vintage lace collection - paperiaarre.com

On my studio shelf I have a plastic bin overflowing with lace that I could possibly, maybe, in special circumstances, use on book covers or mixed media pieces. The most special family heirloom lace is stored elsewhere in a safe place (where that is, I have forgotten, because safe places are doomed to be forgotten), so the above lot is a selection from the possibly useable lace bin.

a selection from my vintage lace collection - paperiaarre.com

Sometimes the most worn pieces can be the most attractive...

a selection from my vintage lace collection - paperiaarre.com

The blush pink lace is one of my newest finds and I love it!

a selection from my vintage lace collection - paperiaarre.com

This lace bib is one of those family heirloom pieces; it most likely belonged to either my great-grandmother Ester or great-grand-aunt Saima. The level of detail is amazing! The simple tatted lace above was tatted by either Saima or Ester - both of them were great at handicrafts.

a selection from my vintage lace collection - paperiaarre.com

a selection from my vintage lace collection - paperiaarre.com

This card of lace is also from the family stash, and I like to think some of these might also be family-made.

a selection from my vintage lace collection - paperiaarre.com

The lace above and below are my favourites to use on books - the wider the better!

a selection from my vintage lace collection - paperiaarre.com

If you want to find out more about how I actually use lace in my handmade books, have a look at my How to successfully glue different types of lace -tutorial!

accumulator seriali - part 26

antique family photo album / paperiaarre.com As you may very well know, I have tons of old photos of my maternal great grandaunt Saima because her husband Emil was an amateur photographer. The paternal side of my family is much less documented. When I got this beautiful antique family album it had some cabinet photos and some loose photos slipped between the pages, and my father could only name less than a handful of the people featured. Many people have a definite Rantakari look about them (or at least they have noses big enough to be family), but they no longer have names for us remaining.

antique family photo album / paperiaarre.com

The most familiar faces are now hanging on the gallery wall in our hallway, and even fewer photos remain in the album. The album is so worn and tattered the photos remaining barely stay in place, and I've gotten permission to repurpose the album should I want to. The album itself apparently isn't a family treasure, so it remains to be seen whether or not the loose pages will find their way into a mixed media project of mine. For the time being it can stay as it is.

antique family photo album / paperiaarre.com

These sisters were photographed by Tyyne Böök in Helsinki. I'm always happy to see female photographers' names in these cabinet photos. A little detective work revealed that Tyyne had her own photography studio from 1913-1926, and also owned a women's lingerie and embroidery shop.

antique family photo album / paperiaarre.com

A serious Mr. with better posture than his descendants.

antique family photo album / paperiaarre.com As a bookbinder I naturally appreciate the structural aspects of this piece even now that it's falling apart. The velvet spine and corners have lost their nap almost entirely, the cover has also began to flake off, bits fall out if the album is opened, and the clasp is lost. But I imagine this once was a very fine album altogether, back when most people in it still had names.

accumulator seriali - part 25

vintage spools - paperiaarre.com Still sharing sewing related accumulations! My spool collection has grown without much trying. These are all threads I actually use - either in my mixed media work or for sewing endbands for fancy books.

vintage spools - paperiaarre.com

The tallest spools are old artificial silk, purchased for 1€ each, if I remember correctly. My mother and I ran into a huge box of them in a fabric store a long time ago, but sadly only bought a small lot each. The second largest spools are a gift from across the big sea, from the friend who reads my mind and never fails to make me squeal with delight when surprises come in the mail (thanks again, dear!). The rest is from various lots of vintage sewing notions I've found online.

vintage spools - paperiaarre.com

It seems no time can take away the sheen of silk. Some thread has become brittle with time, but some is still truly as good as new. It's always a pleasure to include bits of old silk thread in my mixed media work.

buttonhole silks for sewing endbands to books - paperiaarre.com

This is the box where I keep silks dedicated to sewing endbands. These are buttonhole silks, mostly Gütermann, some brand new (=bought in the past 10 years by me), some passed down from my grandmother. I couldn't find the thread on Gütermann website anymore, so it may now be discontinued, which is a real shame. This thread is wonderful to work with, and I hate the idea of not being able to get more.

buttonhole silks for sewing endbands to books - paperiaarre.com

As you can see, the thread becomes thinner the newer the spool, so it's a tricky business coming up with colour combinations using only thread from the same era. But one can hardly go wrong with pairing that delicious mustard yellow with gray! I've yet to decide the colours for my next fine binding, but I'm really tempted...

PS. My apologies for the site being suuuper slow for the past week! My hosting company is having issues, and it's really beginning to bug me. I may have to move if things don't improve quickly...

accumulator seriali - part 24

vintage buttons, snaps and hooks - accumulator seriali - part 24 / paperiaarre.com

I adore buttons. My collection is pretty massive, so I try to break it down and share just a bit at a time. This post features a big part of my collection of buttons, hooks and eyes, and snaps that are still on their original cards.

vintage buttons, snaps and hooks - accumulator seriali - part 24 / paperiaarre.com vintage buttons, snaps and hooks - accumulator seriali - part 24 / paperiaarre.com

Koh-i-noors from Czechoslovakia with Swedish, French, and German text.

vintage buttons, snaps and hooks - accumulator seriali - part 24 / paperiaarre.com

Above you see the back side of those lovely white linen buttons sewn onto a black card. What a gorgeous label, don't you think?

vintage buttons, snaps and hooks - accumulator seriali - part 24 / paperiaarre.com

Tiny linen buttons. I've made a few buttons like this myself, a long, long, time ago, but they were nowhere near this small or intricate.

vintage buttons, snaps and hooks - accumulator seriali - part 24 / paperiaarre.com

This long strip of metal buttons is one of my cherished finds from the Spitalfields Antique Market. The reverse is equally lovely (if not more).

vintage buttons, snaps and hooks - accumulator seriali - part 24 / paperiaarre.com

I wonder if Florence will be kind to us and brings more treasures like these to my path. I really hope so - there's always room for more vintage buttons!